- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Find a job

Subscribe for free

All things Pharma

Creating a culture that uses mistakes to learn

R K Powar explains why it is important to take responsibility for our failures.

We live in a culture where more is expected, be it in our personal, social or work spheres. In organisations results are required yesterday, targets upon being achieved get doubled and more is expected. When things are done in a rush mistakes will occur sometimes leading to failure.

When things go wrong the “blaming game” kicks in and there is a tendency to look outside ourselves , all too often blaming others, faulting policies, procedures and infrastructures in organisations. Individuals that blame others lose out on learning opportunities and in the long run become poor performers and eventually lose credibility. Equally organisations with a strong blame culture become less productive, less creative and ultimately less successful.

Therefore for both individual and organisational success a culture needs to be created where we don’t blame others for our mistakes and where we are encouraged to take responsibility of our failures. At a practical level individuals should not be ridiculed when things go wrong but encouraged to share their mistakes with the emphasis being on turning mistakes into learning opportunities. However like with everything else this in theory is easier than putting into practice as it calls for a total paradigm shift in the blame culture.

Dr R K Powar has over ten years experience in the pharmaceutical industry and provides a range of tailored programmes to help staff improve on their Softer S’s skill base.

Email: r11osyconsultants@yahoo.co.uk

LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/r11osyconsultants

Twitter: @ravipowar

- Advertisement -

MORE FROM AUTHOR

- Advertisement -

LATEST POSTS

Subscribe

Sign up to receive your free UK subscription to Pf Magazine and our digital newsletters, for all the essential headlines, Jobs of the Week, and thought-provoking features.

Claim my free subscription